Jane Yeadon's books


 

When Jane Yeadon decided that she wanted to become a nurse, the Swinging Sixties had arrived in style. But before her training the nearest she got to anything swinging was the udder of the cow on their farm in the north-east of Scotland. It was time to leave for the bright lights and some modern life. It Won't Hurt a Bit is the story of Jane's journey from the farm she loved and the schoolwork she hated through to her nurse training and the many adventures along the way. It's a warm, funny and affectionate memoir from a simpler time as Jane and her new friends tackle the ups and downs of a gruelling three-year training, some scary matrons and a variety of challenging patients and their relatives. All to the backdrop of the fabulous Swinging Sixties.


 

Training to be a nurse in the Swinging Sixties was demanding but great fun. In this sequel to It Won't Hurt a Bit, it's time for Jane Yeadon to move on from her basic training to her exciting new life as a midwife. It's a whole new challenge with a new set of intriguing colleagues far from home as she heads from Scotland to Belfast for a brand new adventure. When she arrives at the Royal Maternity Hospital, Jane encounters the usual glacial matron overseeing the nurses and doing her best to keep them out of too much trouble, as well as fellow nurses English Cynthia, Timid Marie and Strongminded Margaret. As they're thrown in at the deep end, Jane discovers that this is life in the medical fast lane where there are very few straightforward births and every day is a steep learning curve. And as well as their daily work, the nurses get caught up in the local issues and find out that there is also much to learn about this divided community which is rapidly being overshadowed by the gathering Troubles which will soon rip the city apart.


 

Who'd have thought a missing bacon rasher and a teaspoon would play a part in advancing someone's career? It's the late '60s and Jane Yeadon has always wanted to be a district nurse. Staff nursing in a ward where she's challenged by an inventory-driven ward sister, she reckons it's time to swap such trivialities for life as a district nurse. Independent thinking is one thing, but Jane's about to find that the drama on district can demand instant reaction; and without hospital back up, she's usually the one having to provide it. She meets a rich cast of patients all determined to follow their own individual star, and goes to Edinburgh where Queen Victoria's Jubilee Institute's nurse training is considered the creme de la creme of the district nursing world. Call Me Sister recalls Jane's challenging and often hilarious route to realising her own particular dream.


 

Growing up on a farm in the north of Scotland could be both rewarding and challenging. Now, bestselling author Jane Yeadon recounts her childhood before her nursing adventures started, in her own unique and entertaining style. Jane and her little sister Elizabeth never had it easy, especially on Mondays. As their mother shut herself away to write her popular newspaper articles on the everyday life of a tenant crofter, the girls were given tasks around the farm by Dod, the farm grieve. On a farm where money was tight, the extra income meant a lot, especially with their father dead after a tragic motorbike accident. As they grow up, the girls start to see life on the farm in very different ways but both know that running a farm demands hard, physical toil. And it's often from them. In a world where you should either be useful or keep out of the way, Jane finds herself divided between hearing the freedom call of the winds that blow over the moorland farm and those of its ceaseless demands for attention. Telling Tales recounts how Jane learns about her place in the scheme of things, the hard way. Poignant and touching, this nostalgic account of life on the farm recalls a way of life which was so recent but is now all but forgotten.

 

 
 

Available locally at The Washington in Forres and The Nairn Bookshop.

Primary 4 pupils from a local primary school helped Jane Yeadon to write "The Ancient Secret of Cloven Hill". The book's blurb has been written by one of them.
Here's what she says.
A magical story with lots of adventures and weird people with a funny number of toes.
There's Big George, an angry hill warden, Morag who is cheeky, Rosie who bosses Burns her brother who says, 'Ruggabug' instead of swearing and Picker Macsnot who is scary.
It's all about friends thinking, teamwork and sneaking out at night.

Watch out for the moving spider as you turn the pages of this amazing book!

Suitable for age 8+ by children.

 

 
     

About Black & White Publishing
Founded in 1999 Black & White Publishing is now one of the leading independent book publishing companies in Scotland. Committed to publishing the best books from the most talented writers in the UK and beyond we currently have more than 250 titles in print, including general non-fiction, biography, sport and humour, as well as selected fiction, Young Adult and children’s books. Visit their website